‘Putz’, Pastille Burners and Palaces: the making of ‘Bird House’

 

Krakow Cathedral

When Joe Pearson enquired whether I’d like to produce a title to fit in with his ongoing project of making both selected re-prints and new titles in the old Bantam series of tiny picture-books, I didn’t hesitate for even a moment before saying yes. I’d taken a lot of pleasure in Joe’s reprints of Hilary Stebbing’s two titles for Bantam, The Silly Rabbits and The Animals Went in Two by Two, poring over them repeatedly. I’m a big Stebbing fan but original copies of her books are hard to find these days, so the re-prints were an easily affordable treat.

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There are just fourteen pages per Bantam book plus front and back cover, a constraint that can either focus or defeat the illustrator/author. Stebbing rose magnificently to the challenge with vibrant images that all but leap off the page. The Silly Rabbits reprint has been at my elbow as inspiration throughout the process of working on my own book. If I could capture even a fraction of the vivacity of her approach, then I’d be content.

Joe came straight to the point with his suggestion of a subject: birds. There had been birds of many varieties in our first book together, Simon Armitage’s Hansel & Gretel: a nightmare in eight scenes, and Joe suggested that if time was too short for me to make new work, we might profitably look at some of the unused drawings made for that project.

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But once the idea was in my head, I was off like a rocket to make new work. I thought briefly about whether I’d write or commission a new story, but greedy for all the space I could grab for the illustrations, decided in the end to make a picture-book, pure and simple. I considered producing a sort of nursery primer Guide to British Birds, and began sketching. But the more I sketched, the more I realised that I wanted to make not a book of birds as observed in nature, but something imaginary.

My first thoughts focussed on combining birds with some of the foil crèches I’d collected which are a folk art tradition of the city of Krakow in Poland. Only a few weeks previously I’d been making assemblages for my Instagram page that combined foil crèches and vintage tinplate birds. So out came the clockwork cockerels again and the tiny wooden buildings from the Erzgebirge toy-making region of the Black Forest, and rather strangely it began to feel as though the idea might have been cooking in my head from a time before Joe came to me with the project.

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I began arranging the foil crèches on my work table, combining them with small painted wooden birds, another Polish craft tradition of which I have many examples.

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Below: Polish ‘folk art’ foil nativity from Krakow, to which I’ve added tiny painted wooden birds for the photograph. All things Polish and folk-artish in my collection come from the wonderful online emporium, Frank & Lusia.

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For about a day the title of the new book was to be Palace of Birds. But it changed as soon as I came up with the more direct, Bird House.

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Suddenly the dining-room table, where I’d temporarily set up my work space, was piling high with Polish birds, Russian tinplate chickens and foil crèches. Here a hen stands atop a ‘Head’ by artist Peter Slight.

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There were other possibilities stirring. I’d fairly recently acquired a box full of vintage Chinese chenille birds, and they too came out.

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Below: worktable with the many Polish painted birds that contributed their services to the project. Note the copy of Hilary Stebbing’s The Silly Rabbits.

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Ideas for bird houses developed fast. I researched at the computer, sketchbook in lap, filling it with drawings of Staffordshire pastille-burners in the forms of fanciful castles and follies.

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Below: project-book sketch of a Staffordshire folly and a Polish bird.

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Then there were vintage versions of the glitter-encrusted Christmas decorations known as ‘Putz’, which before World War II had been popular Japanese novelty exports to the US.

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I made many fully worked-up trial images in preparation for beginning my work in earnest. In this one from my project-book you can see how I adapted the Putz House shown above.

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And here – in a detail from the finished illustration – a change of bird strengthens the image.

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Recalling the china pagodas that decorated the goldfish bowls of my childhood, I began trawling for examples that might go nicely with my chenille birds. So many ideas, so little space!

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Below: project-book drawings of Russian clockwork chickens.

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Bird House will be published later this year. Produced in a very small edition, I suggest that if this book appeals and you fancy a copy, then you contact Joe at the Design for Today Instagram page. There you’ll find a post about it where you can leave a comment to notify him of your interest. On this one I fear it will be ‘reserve early to avoid disappointment’.

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7 thoughts on “‘Putz’, Pastille Burners and Palaces: the making of ‘Bird House’

    • Like you, Judy, I love making images of birds. I’m so lucky that Joe came to me with this project. His suggestion couldn’t have come at a better time as a distraction from what’s going on all around..

      • Your birds and compositions put mine to shame. But never mind that. You are amazing. When did you start on this one? I like the big birds / small houses better too. I don’t know why. Is it because they seem surreal / otherworldly and we’re not sure if the bird is gigantic or the house tiny? Not sure.

        • Well that’s simply not true. I LOVE your bird drawings, full of charm and wit and fantastic character.

          It’s all been done in a tearing hurry, though perhaps that gives a wrong impression. More that I went like a sprinter because I was fuelled by enthusiasm and ideas that wouldn’t let me rest. I spent a week sketching and brainstorming, and then made an illustration a day for the duration of the fourteen pages plus covers. If I didn’t complete a page a day I couldn’t sleep. A bit crazed. And I could do it all again tomorrow, because the ideas just keep coming.

  1. What a delight this will be, you’re such a busy bee Clive, never stopping, ideas flooding and I can see you’re enjoying every second! These images are so colourful and alluring, they cheer me up no end…xxL

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