The Allure of Toy Theatre

Nineteenth century Redington backdrop for Charles II, professionally hand coloured

I first came across Toy Theatre sheets in the 1960s, when as a boy I was given a stack of them by the actor and playwright, Bill Meilen, who thought I might enjoy them. The sheets were a mix from a great many ‘plays’, the quaint titles of which printed along the top edges were all unknown to me. There were a gratifying variety of backdrops, cut cloths, headers, ground-rows and wings, few of which matched up, depicting rural idylls, dense pine forests, mountain passes ripe for bandit attacks, raging storms at sea and buildings that ranged from rustic hovels to fanciful palaces. There were no scripts, no theatre in which to hang the scenes, and no characters either, but I was a resourceful child and deft with my pencils and paints, so the omissions were just challenges I found stimulating. I built myself a toy theatre, and made the characters to fit the scenes.

Some time later, when I left my home in Wales to attend a school in London, I discovered Benjamin Pollock’s Museum and Toyshop, and thereafter I was lost. The toy theatre disease was in my blood, and it was incurable. All my pocket money was spent in the Pollock’s shop, and later theatre became my profession. As a theatre director and designer I was forever making model stages, because that’s how full-size sets are designed. And later, when I began to work as an artist, I returned to that early love of toy theatres, making them as a part of my practice, but also just for pleasure.

Title-page character sheet for Green’s Wapping Old Stairs

Toy theatres are much on my mind right now as I have two shortly-to-be-announced toy theatre-related projects nearing completion. (And I must first offer my apologies for having to hold back on revealing them for a little while longer.) But while clearing my desk in preparation for the next project, I came across a photocopied reference-set of all the characters and scenes for Green’s production of Wapping Old Stairs, published originally in 1845. Lingering over the loose sheets as I numerically ordered them ready to be put away, I had a sudden pang of the old joy and anticipation that came upon me all those decades ago, when first I held sheets of 19th century toy theatre scenery and tried to figure out exactly how to cut and colour and assemble it all into a three dimensional setting just waiting to be filled with the characters I planned to create.

Victorian toy theatre sheets didn’t come with instructions. The scripts, printed and gathered into chapbooks, gave the order of scenes, but the would-be toy theatre producer had to use imagination and ingenuity to get the stage into a performable state, and it’s a fact that for most, the visions in their heads of how the production would look, were infinitely more splendid before clumsiness and impatience had rendered the results disappointing. Colouring the sheets alone was a minefield, as the clarity of black and white became muddied with the inept application of watercolours. The dreams of how wonderful a scene would look when expertly painted and assembled, were what kept me going, the perfect example of optimism overriding past experiences.

The art of Toy Theatre reached magnificent heights in the 19th century. The sheets sold by the print shops and toy-sellers were so beautiful in their pristine states, that any child confronted with hundreds of them pegged out for inspection, must have been incoherent with the agonies of choice and the calculations of how far their pennies would stretch. Characters and scenery for entire plays, including scripts, could be had by those whose pockets were deep. There were even professionally hand-coloured sets available, for those with no skill with watercolours and brushes. For the rest, the productions had to be purchased in plain black and white, a sheet at a time, with each purchase carrying the producer a little closer to the goal of a full production.

Here, in a microcosm of the problems that have historically made toy theatres a challenge for their builders, I show the components of a single scene from Wapping Old Stairs that illustrates how bewilderingly complicated the matter of interpretation can be, and how any misjudgements would almost certainly result in disappointment. On the title-page character-sheet can be found a small vignette of how Scene 3 of the play might look on the stage. Here’s an enlargement of it:

Enlarged decorative vignette of Scene 3 from Wapping Old Stairs

Below, the backdrop itself. It’s different in many details from the vignette. Most notable at even a cursory glance, is that the buildings of the vignette are much more elegant, whereas they’re undeniably stolid and lumpen in the backdrop. Moreover the outside edges of the buildings are visible in the vignette, whereas they’ve been cropped in the backdrop. I wonder which came first, vignette or backdrop. Whichever the order, the sketch above is so sure, and so lively and fresh that I’m certain it’s not by the same hand as the backdrop. (I do have a warm affection for the rather foursquare, naive style of British toy theatre scenery, quite different in character to what was appearing in European toy theatres of the time, so it’s perhaps unfair to draw comparisons between the deftness of the above sketch – which would be a perfect illustration in a book – and the toy theatre backdrop below, which also serves the purpose for which it was made.)

A sheet of 4 x wing-pieces carries the information that they can be used for several of Green’s productions, including Wapping Old Stairs. Confusingly wing sheets didn’t offer the numbers of the scenes they were intended for. It was a question of trial and error and putting them where they best fitted.

So how can we be sure that the wings were meant to accompany this particular scene in Wapping Old Stairs? It’s because, helpfully, an illustration was included with the set of sheets that was intended to convey the full splendour of the scenery when set up on the toy theatre stage, complete with a tableau of the characters in the closing moments of the play, and two of the wings from the sheet of four are flanking the stage.

However the artist has stretched the scene well beyond the edges of the backdrop as provided, and indeed this ‘panorama’ format is not at all representative of the proportions of most British toy theatres, which offered a much more compressed image, side to side.

Enlargement of the ‘panoramic’ scene

In the illustration the wing pieces allow the audience to see the full width of the backdrop, whereas in reality on a stage of the proportions for which this play was designed, even one set of wings would substantially close down the audience’s view of the backdrop. So neither of the two images – not the vignette and not the panorama – may be relied upon as indicators of how the scene will look on the stage, though they’d almost certainly be regarded as reliable by anyone cutting and pasting away and hoping the result would look as good as it does in the illustrations.

So back in the nineteenth century making toy theatres from the sheets sold by print-shops was always a perilous activity, fraught with the anxieties that the results would be disappointing. These days we have the wonders of inkjet so we don’t have to cut up anything irreplaceable, but there is still the business of getting it right, and making something that matches, at least in part, the wonderful dream that we have in our heads of the perfect production.

Nineteenth century toy theatre sheet with original hand colouring

11 thoughts on “The Allure of Toy Theatre

  1. Perhaps being a child of the Fifties the Pollocks toy theatres seemed very old fashioned. I preferred the toy theatres that were more modern. The Spears Mickey Mouse theatre with a curtain I had trouble operating and survived long after the rest of the theatre was lost. Similarly with the Shredded Wheat Disney cut out theatre of which all that survived was the singing harp from Mickey and the Beanstalk. I remember the treasure hour series too, especially Cinderella and Aladdin, though I was too clumsy to operate them successfully. I remember a torch spotlight crashing down at a most inconvenient moment when I was trying to give a performance for my parents! Allan.

    • I was a child of the fifties, too, and loved my Treasure Hour Toy Theatres, particularly The Rustlers of Rocky Ranch, which boasted a cowboy rodeo-riding a steer! (As I recall, all the Treasure Hour productions were available at Woolworths.) But because I had these enticing 19th century sheets, so elaborate and curious and picturesque, I loved them, too, and they caught in my heart strings, got entangled there, and stuck fast.

      I’d give a lot for that Mickey Mouse Jack and the Beanstalk from Shredded Wheat. Classic Disney, before the wall-to-wall-princesses.

  2. Wapping had me thinking / remembering back to London days and dad talking about the docks where the timber came from together with the veneers. The Prospect of Whitby pub, set on the river, (possibly with stais /steps.) A wonderful glimpse ot past times AND past-times, I’d have loved, back in the day, to have made up some stories to go along with your sets.
    Happy days, love as always
    B x

    • The set of backdrops for Wapping Old Stairs positively drips with nostalgia, and I’m reminded by them of some of the scenes in David Lean’s wonderful film adaptation of Oliver Twist. And I’m betting you would have indeed made marvellous accompanying scripts for my toy theatre, back in the day! I rather kept it a secret, as I knew it was not exactly the kind of hobby most boys would admit to. (!!!)

      • I hope / think, we four would just’ve accepted the ‘hobby’ as part of your artistic endeavours, which, quite frankly, never surprised us.
        B xx

    • Toy theatre has become very popular in Lockdown. I guess it’s form of entertainment easily done with few materials, and is a family-friendly occupation, making and performing plays on miniature stages.

    • I’m glad you enjoyed it, Lizzie. I realised when I’d finished that there probably wouldn’t be anyone remotely interested in anything so particular, so I’m very pleased you liked it well enough to leave a comment.

      • This is a bit late as a reply , (a month!! )I only just saw you’d written a reply back. Just to say even in this hurried world I always enjoy reading your posts, and usually try to find time to read them properly! xxx

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